Our favorite books about South Korea

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In honor of Multicultural Children’s Book Day, I thought I would share our favorite children’s book about South Korea. Some of these we own and some we have borrowed from the library (actually all are at the Camp Humphreys Library).

 

One of Clarissa’s favorite books to borrow from the library is Goyangi Means Cat by Christine McDonnell. A little girl is adopted from South Korea and comes home to live with her new family in America. She doesn’t know any English but her family quickly learns a few Korean words, specifically “goyangi” because of their pet cat that the little girl loves so much.

We own Bee-Bim-Bop by Linda Sue Park because Clarissa loved it so much when we borrowed it from the library that we read it every day for a week straight and actually had to learn to make bibimbap from the recipe in the book.

Last year, we reviewed Carole P. Roman’s If You were me and lived in… South Korea. I think Clarissa likes it because it talks about some of the places we have visited. I think it gives you some idea of Korean culture as it discusses Korean words for mom and dad, money, school, and sports.

Lately, Clarissa has been interested in Sori’s Harvest Moon Day by Uk-Bae Lee. This story is about a little girl and her family and how they travel to their grandparents’ house for Chuseok, which is one of the two major holidays in South Korea. It is interesting to see how another culture celebrates a holiday to honor ancestors and spend time together.

Another book we borrowed from the library is called The Firekeeper’s Son by Linda Sue Park. This story is about a boy who lives by the sea. His family has the important job of lighting a fire on the mountain each night if everything is calm. Each mountain has a family to light a fire. This way, the king will know if there are invaders in the land. If the fires are not lit, then the king will send soldiers to help. One day, the boy’s father hurts his ankle and he has to light the fire himself.

The library on post has an entire section of Korean children’s literature. Some of it is Korean folktales and others are books written in Korean. But these are our favorites.

Carole P Roman Children’s Books Review

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Clarissa has always loved books. She has several in her bedroom and we go to the library on a regular basis. She has her favorites but is always excited to get something new. I had never heard of Carole P Roman before this review, but I thought we would enjoy reading her children’s books and collections anyway.

We were able to choose three books from a very long list. We chose Can a Princess Be a Firefighter?, If you were me and lived in… South Korea: A Child’s Introduction to Cultures around the World, and One to Ten: Squirrel’s Bad Day. Clarissa was so excited to receive them that she HAD to be in the picture with the books.

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Clarissa’s favorite book of the three is Can a Princess Be a Firefighter?. The book has two sisters and an adult but you only ever see the adults legs so we can’t figure out if it is the mom or the dad. Clarissa really wants a sister so that is one reason that she likes this book. The story itself has a great message. The girls like to dress up and play princess and so they want to know if they have to stop being a princess when they grow up. The adult assures them that they will “always be a princess to me.” I also really like that the adult tells the children that when they grow up they should choose a job that they really enjoy and that it is okay to change your mind or do more than one career. As a mom, I want Clarissa to grow up to use her gifts to serve others but also to do something that she loves to do. I also like the message that you can change your mind or choose something new in a different season.

The next book we chose was If you were me and lived in… South Korea: A Child’s Introduction to Cultures around the World. Obviously, we chose this one because we have lived in South Korea for the past three years. I wanted a book for the house that would remind Clarissa about this culture when she is older and we live in America again. This book did not disappoint. It is written is a very conversational manner so that there is information but it doesn’t seem like a reference book. Clarissa really enjoyed the pictures. I was happy to see that some of our experiences are included in the book. For example, my favorite tourist site that we have visited is the Korean Folk Village in Yongin (you can read about that trip here). When we got to the page on Korean barbecue, Clarissa said, “We’ve done that before!” Each page also listed a few Korean words and their meanings.

 

There are twenty books in this series and I am sure we will order more. There is one on China which we will definitely read if we head to China before we leave. I was disappointed to see that she doesn’t have one on Japan or Hong Kong which are places we have already visited. If we move to Europe, there are several choices though.

The final book, One to Ten: Squirrel’s Bad Day, wasn’t our favorite. Squirrel drops his acorns and thinks it’s the worst thing ever. His friend Rabbit wants to help him with perspective by assigning a number from one to ten to the problem. I appreciate trying to teach kids perspective but Clarissa really couldn’t get into the book. I don’t think she enjoyed the illustrations. She is probably a little young for the concept as well. I do feel like as Clarissa gets older we can have some conversations about keeping things in perspective though so elementary school kids might enjoy this book.

I enjoyed the books written by Carole P. Roman. You can find both the print books and kindle versions for sale on Amazon. Because she has written so many books, you may want to read posts from the other reviewers if there is a different story that you are interested in.

Carole P. Roman books and collections {Carole P. Roman Reviews}

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