Airport limousine bus to Incheon

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One nice thing about living in Pyeongtaek is that we live closer to Seoul. It makes for a nice day trip. But the airport is actually in Incheon, not Seoul, which is at least a 2 hour drive.

On our vacation to Okinawa, we decided to try the airport limousine bus instead of messing with traffic, tolls, and airport parking. It was very easy.

We called a taxi to pick us up at about 730 and then waited at the bus stop. It is the same bus stop as the 20 bus by the main gate (in front of the Volvo dealer /Christine Realty).

The purple bus was right on time, 7:55 AM. The driver got off the bus to help us store our luggage. He asked if we were going all the way to Incheon because the bus makes several stops.

The cost is very reasonable. Adults pay 13,300 won (a little less than $13) and children pay 6,700 won so our family of 3 paid a little less than $30 to get from base to the airport which I think is great for a 2.5 hour trip. You can either pay with won (exact change) or your tmoney (subway) card.

The bus was a comfortable temperature. The seats recline. Each seat has a vent and a light. There is even space overhead to put your coat and bookbag.

On the way back, you actually buy a ticket. Once you clear customs in Incheon go straight and there is a sign that says airport limousine bus. There is even a desk for foreigners.

There are two options for your trip home. You can either take Anjeong-ri outside the main gate, or you can go to Pyeongtaek Station. The bus for Pyeongtaek Station comes more often and is the same price, 13,300 won for adults and 6,700 for children.

We chose to go to Pyeongtaek Station because the next bus was in about 50 minutes instead of the 2.5 hours we would need to wait for the bus to Anjeong-ri.

The bus from Incheon to Pyeongtaek took about 2 hours (1.5 if you are going to Songtan). The bus station was closed for the night when we arrived. After leaving the bus station, turn left (towards Daiso). In a couple of blocks you will arrive at AK Plaza /Pyeongtaek train station where there is always a line of taxis waiting.

The taxi from AK Plaza to somewhere near the Anjeong-ri gate of Camp Humphreys should cost about 10,000 won ($10).

Both busses were easy to use and comfortable. I think next time, we will see which bus fits our schedule better to decide if we will leave from Anjeong-ri or Pyeongtaek bus terminal.

3/8 Market Tour with One Stop Realty 

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On Saturday, Danny from One Stop Realty  offered a tour of the 3/8 Market in Anjeong-ri. The market meets on days that have either a 3 or 8. I have been several times but didn’t recognize everything in the market. 

The tour began at One Stop which is on a road that runs parallel to the main shopping cobblestone street in Anjeong-ri. There is ample parking near his office if you have a car. 

We left shortly after 11 and headed to the market. The first stop was grains. Plain white rice is bad for your cholesterol. Often at a restaurant, your white rice will be mixed with a grain to make it healthier. The black one turns your rice purple and it is supposed to keep your hair black instead of turning gray. 

Then we passed the river fishing nets. The rivers in Korea look wide, but most are only knee deep. This fishing tent collects smaller fish that would feed one person. 

We learned two important words as we passed the stands that sold dried fruit, nuts, and other snacks. “Mott” (like the applesauce) means “taste.” So if you see something you are curious about, point to the food, say “Mott” and point to your mouth. The other word was “service” which means “free.” So when you pick out your food say “service?” and they may add something extra to your bag. 

He explained about the various seafood. Apparently the small octopus are not babies. There are just small species of octopus. You tell the man which fish you want, and he will debone it for you. 

Danny’s sister in law was on the tour as well and was very knowledgeable about herbs and spices. She explained about different herbs that could be used for to make medicinal teas. If anyone on the tour had a question she could not answer, she or Danny would just ask the stand owner and then translate the answer. 

One of booths sold eggs. These eggs are the same color inside as outside. They are slow boiled all day at a jimjilbang (bathhouse). The rice cakes are made from the rice that sticks to the bottom of the rice cooker. 

The market also had plenty of fruits and vegetables, desserts, as well as fresh homemade seaweed, tofu, side dishes, and noodles. Sometimes you pay a little more for the homemade items at the market than the store, but it is usually made fresh that morning or the day before. 

After our tour, we went back to One Stop for lunch. The tour itself was free and then he served a traditional pork belly barbecue lunch for 10,000 won (less than $10). The food was delicious, though I forgot to take pictures. 

In addition to offering market tours, One Stop Realty also offers cooking classes. He does not even have to be your realtor to attend these events, he just does it as a service to the Camp Humphreys community. If you need a realtor or need help with translation, airport transportation, or a local move, Danny is your guy. 

Market Day 

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One of the reasons we love our new apartment is the location. We can walk to base in about 10 minutes. I walk through Anjeong-ri “the ville” to get to base. There are several shops and restaurants. 

On days that end in either 3 or 8, there is a market day. Clarissa and I went to our first market day on Thursday after storytime. 

Along the Anjeong-ri shopping street, on the end away from the base, you will see tents set up the length of the side road. The stands sell fresh produce, snacks, clothes, handbags, live seafood, toys, and even birds. 

Clarissa was most excited about the live crabs and octopus. She kept trying to touch them. She thought that the birds were pretty but too loud. 

She was also very adamant about buying a watermelon. I told her that if she didn’t eat the watermelon, she would not be allowed to choose things on market day. 

She did eat her watermelon. I will definitely make market day part of our regular schedule. The produce is way cheaper and more fresh than the commissary because it is local. 

Beartree Park 

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About 10 years ago, the South Korean government decided that they wanted to move some of their governing activities further south. They decided to build a new city.

We drove from our new home at Camp Humphreys about a half hour on rural highways to get to Sejong to see Beartree Park

Admission for Clarissa was 8,000 won. Tim and I cost 13,000 won each to get in. We paid about $30 total. You are not allowed to bring food into the park. They will ask when you try to enter. 

The park was beautiful. It was made up of several different gardens. The path from place to place was stroller friendly. But several gardens had signs to park your stroller and not bring it on the garden path. 

Our first stop was the koi pond. Clarissa had a great time feeding the fish. You could buy food for 1,000 won. 

We visited several different gardens on the way to the food court. 

There was an actual restaurant in addition to the food court, but I don’t know what they serve there. There were four traditional options at the food court. We ordered some bibimbap and mandu and ate at a picnic table outside. It was tasty. I prefer my bibimbap with meat though. 

Next was a garden with some bear statues. Clarissa and I had fun pretending to play with the bears. 

Then was the main event. There were two different areas to feed the bears. You could pay 1,000 won for either a cup of cut carrots or a cup of pastry ball looking things. First, we saw the younger bears. Some of them were asleep. But some of them were pretty good at catching the food in their mouths. 

Then, we went to see the big bears. They were excellent at catching food in their mouths. 

Behind the bears was a small park with animal statues. 

There is an observatory but we could see plenty without bothering with that. The brochure said you could also feed deer and listed a petting zoo and a playground so we had other priorities. 

The brochure was misleading. There were deer in a fenced area. There may have been food available earlier in the day, but by 1pm when we were there, no one was selling food. It definitely wasn’t a petting zoo. There were animals that you might keep as pets. Corgis, Guinea pigs, rabbits, sheep, goats. But you weren’t allowed to touch them. There were also peacocks, ducks, and other birds in an unaccessible area. Both times we tried a “petting zoo” in Korea it was like that too. I think they just have a different definition of petting zoo. Clarissa enjoyed seeing the animals just the same. 

The brochure said you could take a walk with a baby bear. That definitely didn’t happen. There were baby bears in the petting zoo area but there was a big sign that said not to touch them. 

We passed more gardens on our way out. There wasn’t actually a playground. There was an area that looked like they might do shows. But nothing was happening at that time. 

We enjoyed our afternoon at Beartree Park. We may go back again before we leave. 

When do you celebrate a new job? 

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Tim has been applying for jobs since our first trip to Japan in December 2015. He was aiming for Japan mostly. 

In November 2016, the ladies of PWOC (Protestant Women of the Chapel) were invited to attend a special meeting of KWOC (Korean Women of the Chapel). During the worship portion of our service, I felt like God said that we were going to stay in Korea. I assumed that meant that we were staying in Daegu and continued life as normal. 

Tim applied for a job shortly after that with six locations, three in Europe and three in Asia. We chose the three Asia locations. While we were in Hawaii in January, Tim received an email asking for an interview. Tim was working crazy hours that week so we asked for an interview the following week when we returned home. 

Tim interviewed at 11pm Tuesday, our time. We woke up to a tentative job offer for the Seoul location that Saturday. Two days later, President Trump signed the hiring freeze. 

Crickets. Nothing for two months. 

We were very surprised when we woke up Saturday, March 25 because Tim received the official job offer for Seoul. All three of us really like Seoul so we were very excited with this offer. 

They asked if Tim could start April 15 since we were already in Korea. We told them no because our lease says that we have to give the landlord 30 days notice in order to break the lease. We gave our landlord notice when they suggested April 30 as a start date. 

That Thursday we found out that the location was actually Camp Humphreys in Pyeongtaek. The headquarters for USFK is in the process of moving from Yongsan to Humphreys so we figured they would eventually move us anyway. It makes sense to send all new hires to Camp Humphreys so that they only have to move once. 

Saturday Tim had to sign a revised offer with the new location. Then they said “oh by the way, your start date may be delayed because travel funding expires April 28.” Since we had already given notice to the landlord, Human Resources said we could move April 27 instead. 

Then we waited. In the military (or overseas moves for government civilians), in order to move from one place to another, you need a document called travel orders. This document allows you to schedule movers and have funding for hotels and transportation during the move. You can’t actually outprocess in one place to go to the next without orders. 

We decided to go to Camp Humphreys on Sunday just to see the base. It is about 30 minutes away from Osan Air Base where Tim lived ten years ago. He is somewhat familiar with the general area. But Clarissa and I had never been to Pyeongtaek. It was nice. The base is huge and they are building all kinds of things to prepare for USFK Headquarters and all of the soldiers who will be stationed there. 

When do you celebrate a new job? When you receive orders… Tim woke up this morning to orders in his email. Now we can officially move in two weeks.